Staying Safe Outdoors

Before heading out to explore the stunning natural landscapes that bless Nelson Tasman, it is important to familiarise yourself with the Outdoor Safety Code.

Below we have summarised the five simple rules that make up the Outdoor Safety Code, along with some helpful resources for travellers, produced by the Mountain Safety Council of New Zealand.

Whether you're heading out on a single day tramp, multi-day tramp or specialised outdoor activity, planning your excursion into the New Zealand back country is essential. You should plan the route you will take, the amount of time it should take you to arrive at your destination, and ensure you have the option of an alternative route to get back safely and quickly if an emergency strikes.

It is important to seek local knowledge, whether that be from the friendly and experienced staff at the local i-SITE, or the Department of Conservation offices.. after all, no-one knows this place better than those who choose to live here. They can help you choose a trip suitable for your skills and experience, and assist in booking accommodation along the way.

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Plan Your Trip

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The Nelson Tasman region is home to a range of walks suitable for every level of fitness and experience, and it is important that you only challenge yourself within your physical limits and experience. New Zealand uses a national system to identify the difficulty level of a track, and the staff at the Department of Conservation offices and i-SITE centres can help you to select walks that are suitable for you based on these ratings.

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Know Your Limits

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New Zealand's weather can be unpredictable, so it is imperative that you consider the effects the weather will have on your trip, and decide whether any changes would be significant enough to alter your trip.

Keep an eye on the Metservice forecasts, and remember that the mountain and rural forecasts can be quite different to the urban forecasts. If the weather does change for the worse, or you encounter bad weather on your trip, consider staying an extra night, changing your route or heading home.

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Be Aware Of The Weather

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Even if you are just heading out on a short day walk, you should tell someone your plans - even if this is just your planned route and your expected return date. A number of our regions walks are remote, with no mobile phone coverage and very few people around, so if something does go wrong the only way our emergency services can help you is if they know you haven't returned.

Where possible, we recommend that you fill out the hut books during your trip, even if you don't stay in the hut.

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Tell Someone Your Plans

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Before heading out, make sure you have enough food, clothing, equipment and emergency rations for the worst case scenario. Depending on your destination, this may include a map, a compass, first aid kit, survival kit, water bottle, food, an appropriate means of communication, warm and waterproof clothing, sturdy boots, as well as a tent or fly in case of hut unavailability.

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Take Sufficient Supplies

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